Pet Dental Care in San Antonio

Our veterinarians offer advanced pet dental care and services such as:

Most pet parents are unaware of just how important regular dental care and examinations are for their petoral healthAs with people, plaque can build up overnight and over time creates tartar along your pet’s gumlinethis process when unchecked increases their risk for periodontal disease and even tooth loss. 

Regular examination and dental care will ensure that your pet’s teeth remain healthy, and help to prevent these health issues from becoming a serious problem as your pet agesOur dental services at Loop 410 Veterinary Hospital are designed to keep your pet’s mouth remain healthy and clean into their golden years. These include: 

  • Routine examinations: The importance of frequent dental examination cannot be overstatedOur preventive care examinations for your pet are helpful in reducing their chances of having dental problems in the future. 
  • Dental cleaning: Similar to human dental cleanings, we offer professional dental cleanings for your pet to remove tartar and bacteria from their mouths. Unlike most human dental cleanings however, we must use anesthesia and pain medication to keep your pet asleep and comfortable throughout the procedure. 
  • Dental surgery: If we discover a dental problem, we may need to perform surgery to correct the condition. Surgery may be warranted to remove diseased and abnormal tissue or lesions in the mouth. To keep your pet comfortable during surgery, we specifically tailor our anesthetic and pain relief protocol to each pet’s individual needs. 

If it’s been a while since your pet has had an oral examination, if you have never been told anything about your pet’s teeth or if you have concerns regarding your pet’s oral health, don’t hesitate to schedule your pet a dental checkup with us today. Including preventative dental care in your pet’s routine will prevent challenging health problems later on down the road. Loop 410 Veterinary Hospital not only provides in-office preventative care, but we can also recommend at-home strategies to protect your pet’s teeth that are based on your pet’s specific needs and life-style.

Pet Dental Care FAQs

When should I start dental care with my pet?

The sooner the better! Starting early is essential to maintain optimal dental health, especially for smaller breeds. Small dogs are more prone to periodontal disease than larger breeds. But this doesn’t mean you can neglect your large breed dog! They need their teeth brushed on a regular basis (at least 3 x weekly) and checkups by the vet. Our veterinarians are experienced in pet dental care and can teach you how to care for your pet’s teeth and gums at home.

How can I tell if my dog or cat has gum disease or other dental problems?

Any of the following can be signs you need to bring your pet for a dental exam as soon as possible:

  • Bad breath
  • Shy’s away when mouth is touched
  • Excessive drooling or drops food from the mouth
  • Oral pain or bleeding
  • Yellow-brown crust of tarter around gumline
  • Missing, loose, or broken teeth
  • Loss of appetite or weight loss

Contact us right away if you notice any of these signs. Dental disease gradually progresses, so if you catch it early you can help to prevent worse problems. The veterinarian can examine your pet to decide if a professional cleaning is required or if other dental treatment will be necessary.

My pet has bad breath or a chipped tooth. What should I do?

Bad breath is a sign of poor dental health and can cause serious problems if left untreated. An infected mouth is dangerous for your pet because it contains bad bacteria than can travel to other parts of the body. Poor dental health can affect your pet’s heart, kidneys, lungs, intestinal tract, and joints. Make regular pet dental care a priority in order to help prevent serious side effects.

How do I brush my pet’s teeth at home?

Training your pet to cooperate with brushing is a gradual process that can take several weeks. To make pet dental care at home a positive experience, be careful not to over-restrain your pet and don’t take too long to finish the job. Having two people involved is best because one can hold onto your pet and the other can do the brushing. Praise your pet throughout the brushing session and offer a treat as a reward when done!

3 Steps to Pet Dental Care and Brushing at Home

  1. Use a small amount of flavored toothpaste (like chicken or beef). Veterinarians do not recommend human toothpaste as it may cause upset stomach in your pet. Rub the finger gently over your pet’s teeth.
  2. Introduce gauze over the finger gradually and gently brush the teeth and gums in a circular motion.
  3. After your pet is used to the gauze finger, you may introduce a special pet toothbrush.

If brushing your pet’s teeth isn’t working for you, or if you notice brown stains on the teeth or bleeding gums, contact Loop 410 Veterinary Hospital for help. We can help find an alternative dental health product better suited for you and your pet.

Remember, regular pet dental care is crucial to the health and happiness of your pet. You owe it to them to provide good brushing at home and checkups at the vet!

How often should I brush my pet’s teeth?

It is ideal to brush your pet’s teeth on a daily basis. Brushing a minimum of 3 times per week is necessary for decreasing plaque and tartar.

Is a special diet necessary to improve the health of my pet’s teeth?

Special dental-friendly food and treats can help prevent plaque and tartar build-up between professional cleanings. They might even increase the amount of time between visits to the vet for cleanings. It is important to be an informed consumer: The Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC), awards a Seal of Acceptance to certain veterinary dental foods and products that meet strict standards in plaque and tartar reduction. You may view the list of products that have been awarded the Seal of Acceptance: www.vohc.org

Veterinary Resources for More Information:

The Veterinary Oral Health Council

The Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC®) awards a Seal of Acceptance for products that adhere to strict dental standards. The VOHC is an entity of the American Veterinary Dental College.

The American Veterinary Dental Society (AVDS)

The American Veterinary Dental Society (AVDS) was founded in 1976. Their goal was to create a forum for advancing the knowledge, education, and awareness of veterinary dentistry among veterinarians, students and the public.

The Veterinary Oral Health Council

The Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC®) awards a Seal of Acceptance for products that adhere to strict dental standards. The VOHC is an entity of the American Veterinary Dental College.

The American Veterinary Dental Society (AVDS)

The American Veterinary Dental Society (AVDS) was founded in 1976. Their goal was to create a forum for advancing the knowledge, education, and awareness of veterinary dentistry among veterinarians, students and the public.